Yellowstone and ‘Supervolcano’ Fears

Yellowstone sits atop a supervolcano that created a massive crater

"Unusual Eruptions" At World's Largest Active Geyser In Yellowstone Stoke "Supervolcano" Fears

One month after we reported that fears of an eruption at the Yellowstone supervolcano continue to grow following the first eruption of the world's largest active geyser for the first time since 2014, overnight Reuters reported  of continued "unusual eruptions" at the same location after said giant geyser erupted no less three times in the past six weeks, including once this week.

The good news, according to geologists, is that while the pattern is "unusual" it is not indicative of a more destructive volcanic eruption brewing beneath Wyoming.

The bad news, is that with geological events in Yellowstone increasingly described by even the most "reputable" mainstream media and scholars as "unusual", the broader public is having trouble believing that everything is just normal.

This is what happened: Steamboat Geyser, which can shoot water as high as 300 feet (91 meters) into the air, erupted on March 15, April 19 and on Friday.

Steamboat Geyser
As the Bozeman Daily Chronicle adds, the Steamboat Geyser eruption on Friday was reported by a park visitor and was estimated to have begun at 6:30 am; that person was likely the only one who witnessed it firsthand, since boardwalks leading to area are closed due to high snowfall notes Gizmodo.Why is this unusual? Because the last time it erupted three times in a year was in 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Yellowstone Volcano Observatory said. Also notable: the last time it erupted prior to March was more than three years ago in September 2014.While this year’s eruptions have (so far) been smaller than a usual Steamboat eruption, the two in April were about 10 times larger than an eruption at the park’s famed Old Faithful Geyser in terms on the amount of water discharged, geologists quoted by Reuters said.


=>The Trump Prophecies: The Astonishing True Story of the Man Who Saw Tomorrow... and What He Says Is Coming Next

SIX VOLCANOES ACROSS THE WORLD ARE THREATENING DANGEROUS ERUPTIONS IN 2018 AND SCIENTISTS ARE WORRIED

01_02_villarrica_volcano_chile
The Villarrica volcano in Chile, as seen in March 2016.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The eruption of Mount Agung on the island of Bali has sparked worldwide media interest, yet volcanic eruptions in Indonesia are nothing new. Of the country’s 139 “active” volcanoes, 18 currently have raised alert levels, signifying higher than normal seismic activity, ground deformation or gas emissions. On a global scale, in any week in 2017, there were at least between 14 and 27 volcanoes erupting.

Most observed volcanic activity takes place along the Pacific Ring of Fire, a region around the Pacific Ocean where several tectonic plates meet, causing earthquakes and a chain of what geologists call subduction zone volcanoes. Other eruptions occur at volcanoes within continental interiors such as Ol Doinyo Lengai in Tanzania, or on oceanic islands like Hawaii. Many also take place hidden from view on the sea floor, with some of the most active underwater volcanoes located in the Tonga-Kermadec island arc in the south-west Pacific.

The current eruptions on land range from gentle lava effusions to moderate-sized explosions and are tiny compared to the largest in Earth’s history. Even the 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora, also in Indonesia, arguably the largest eruption in recent recorded history, is dwarfed by super-eruptions in the geological past such as that of Toba volcano on Sumatra some 74,000 years ago. Toba erupted approximately 70 times more magma than Tambora, helped plunge the earth into another ice age and may have even created a genetic bottleneck in human evolution.


Like
Subscribe and Receive Posts
Subscribe